Where Are They Now?

Donny Osmond (December 27, 2020; 7th segment appearance)

This week we will be taking a look at a former teen idol, Donny Osmond. He found early success alongside his brothers in their family band, made a name for himself with his sister on television, and then found fame as a solo entertainment staring a plethora of avenues. Let’s take a look at his life growing up and see how he got to where he is today!

Born in December of 1957, Osmond first gained fame performing with four of his older brothers in their family band known as The Osmonds. With Donny, the members consisted of brothers Alan, Wayne, Merrill, Jay and Jimmy who would go on to earn several top ten hits and gold albums. They were scouted by the father of Andy Williams and had regular appearances on The Andy Williams Show.

In 1963, Donny Osmond made his debut on the show at the age of five singing “You Are My Sunshine”. The brothers continued to perform on the show throughout the 1960s while at the same time Donny growing up into the teen idol role. He would go on to become the biggest “Cover Boy” pop stars for Tiger Beat magazine in the early 1970s.

He began to perform solo covering songs by 50’s and 60’a artists, such as Roy Orbison, and songs such as “Go Away Little Girl” and “Puppy Love”. In 1974, Donny and his sister Marie were offered their own television show, The Donny & Marie Show, which would run on ABC from 1976 to 1979.

It was somewhat of a variety show with entertainment and musical guests that saw Donny get his start in hosting on television. He would also host two seasons of Pyramid, The Great American Dream Vote, and over in England he would host a show called Identity. He and Marie would host again together in 2008 at the Miss USA Pageant in Las Vegas.

His charismatic personality and great on screen presence would open many doors for Donny after the show got cancelled and he began making cameos on tv shows and in movies throughout the 90’s and 2000’s. In 1978, he appeared in the film Goin’ Coconuts with sister Marie, in 1998, Osmond was chosen as the singing voice of Shang in Disney’s Mulan.

In 1999, he starred as Joseph in the movie version of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. He had an impressive run on some competition shows such as Dancing with the stars in 2009 where he actually went on and won! Recently in 2019, he would appear as the Peacock on The Masked Singer where he unfortunately fell short of the prize and came in second place as the runner up.

In his personal life, Osmond and his family belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as Mormons and has sometimes been criticized for his views, but to each his own as they say. He has been very vocal about the importance of ASL (American Sign Language) due to having two deaf older brothers and a nephew who is hard of hearing. He has stated in interviews that they were born 85% deaf and would use sign language while performing as they were growing up! That is incredible.

Donny is still out there today popping up making random cameos and it is always good to see him performing and entertaining the world with his contagious smile. Who knows what he will do next, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see. But I am sure whatever it is, he won’t forget to wear his favorite purple socks!

This has been Connor Clougherty, The Kid with an old soul on the Bob Katzen Show. Join us next weekend to hear about what has happened to another star from the past and find out, Where Are They Now.

Fun Facts

FF #1 Osmond has been an honorary member of the Anxiety and Depression Assoc of America Board of Directors since 2004. Osmond has spoken publicly about having social anxiety disorder.

FF #2 He went to extreme measures to revamp his image.

After his first failed attempt at Broadway success in the 1982 clunker, Little Johnny Jones, Osmond sought professional guidance to help revamp his wholesome “puppy love” image. Enlisting the services of entertainment guru Steven Machat and British singer-songwriter Peter Gabriel, Osmond attempted a major comeback as a contemporary pop artist.

In addition to creating a new sound, the former teen heartthrob went for an entirely different look. The 1989 self-titled album cover featured Osmond in a leather jacket, gazing pensively away from the camera, completely devoid of his signature smile.

FF #3 Donny didn’t have much luck making male friends although the girls were all over him. He states:

“I was never considered cool throughout my teens: a very important time to be accepted by someone, especially your peers,” Osmond told the Guardian. “Yes, I had all the screaming women, but the guys hated my guts.”

FF #4 Donny’s second passion, after music, is home decor.

On top of headlining at the Flamingo in Las Vegas recently, Osmond runs a successful home decor business called Donny Osmond Home with his wife, Debbie.

Mike Lookinland (November 22, 2020; 6th segment appearance)

Have you ever been sitting at home watching some reruns of your favorite shows and you say “oh man I loved this character. I wonder where they are now…”. So have I! Today we will be looking at what happened to the youngest Brady brother, played by Mr. Mike Lookinland.

The Brady Bunch was a show beloved by millions that ran from 1969 to 1974. As you know the show followed a large blended family of six kids, three girls and three boys, and the hyginx and family drama that ensued in their day to day lives. Topics of young to teenage life mixed with the awkward scenarios of living in a new blended family. The Brady kids were all fun characters, but today we are focusing on the youngest boy Bobby Brady and what happened to his career after the show.

Mike Lookinland started his acting career at age 7, and by age 9 had been seen in numerous commercials for Band Aids, Cheerios, and some toy brands. While filming the Brady Bunch, Lookinland lent his voice to play Oblio (Oh-B-Low) in the 1971 animated film The Point! In 1974, after the Brady Bunch had wrapped its filming, he starred in the blockbuster film The Towering Inferno, alongside Paul Newman and Jennifer Jones. He was also involved in the 1970’s show The Secret of Isis about a “seemingly normal school teacher, who transforms into the Egyptian goddess when presented with crises a mere mortal cannot resolve”. The 1970s were a busy time for Lookinland, but his acting credits never surpassed that of little Bobby Brady.

Lookinland reprised his role in the 1988 Christmas special A Very Brady Christmas and again in the 1990’s series The Bradys, which focused on the Brady kids all grown up as adults, who saw that coming. In the show, Bobby Brady was involved in a car accident which resulted in Lookinland acting from a wheelchair for most of the series. In 2019, he joined the rest of the Brady kids in the series A Very Brady Renovation which showcased the house used in the original Brady Bunch show being renovated with guest appearances by the kids who would help renovate their respective rooms while reminiscing about the show. A real treat for die hard Brady fans.

In his personal life, Mike Lookinland took up a passion behind the scenes of television. He dropped out of the University of Utah to pursue a career as a production assistant and camera operator. He has worked on the Halloween franchise of horror movies in the 80’s as well as appearing as a camera op in the background of the 2000’s film Growing Up Brady, which starred Mike’s own son playing Bobby Brady. Like father, like son as they say.

In 1987, Mike married Kelly Wermuth whom he met while working on Halloween 4. They have two kids, Scott and Joe. The Lookinlands are currently living life in Mike’s home state of Utah, where Mike runs a business that makes decorative concrete in Salt Lake City.

From child commercial star to artistic concrete architect, Mike Lookinland has had quite the life, but to us he will always be known and loved as little Bobby Brady. This is Connor Clougherty, The Kid with an old soul on the Bob Katzen Show. Join us next weekend to hear about what has happened to another star from the past and find out, Where Are They Now.

Fun Facts

FF #1 – Mike was almost not Bobby Brady. Mike’s family decided Mike should take the role as Bobby Brady over a role he was offered as the son Eddie Corbett in “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father” – a role that eventually went to Brandon Cruz. Mike’s family thought that it would be healthier for him to be around other kids, rather than being the only child amongst an all-adult cast which was the case on “The Courtship of Eddie’s father.” Had the decision gone the other way, Mike wouldn’t be Bobby Brady and I probably wouldn’t be telling you where he is now.

FF #2 – Robert Reed, who played the father Mike Brady, was responsible for Mike’s interest in cameras and eventually to his job as a cameraman. Robert Reed gave Super 8 movie cameras to all the kids for gifts and Mike became fascinated with cameras. He used to sit next to the camera men on the set and ask tons of questions, learning all he could.

FF #3 – Mike’s natural hair color was strawberry blonde and it was very wavey. But the producers dyed his hair black with Clairol Hair Color #43 and straightened it for the show in order to match the hair color of Peter and Greg and his dad Mike Brady. The lights on set though were so hot that his dye job would sometimes run down his face. During the last two seasons, his natural hair color was finally allowed to show.

FF #4 – Outside of TV Land, Lookinland has described himself as a major Deadhead, having been to over 100 Grateful Dead shows across the country.

Wayne Newton (November 15, 2020; 5th segment appearance)

Sometimes as I sit and go through my record collection and listen to all the great hits we know and love, it amazes me how many artists had great hits at such a young age! Off the top of my head I can think of Ricky Nelson, Bobby Darin, and Paul Anka, all who found success in their early 20’s and kept that fame going as they got older. This week however, we will be looking at one of those young lads who may have flown under the superstar radar. Throughout the years, he has been referred to as The Midnight Idol, Mr. Las Vegas and Mr. Entertainment. I’m talking about Wayne Newton!
Born in 1942 in Virginia to some blue collar working parents, Newton never really found himself at a place he could call home. During WW2, his father served in the US Navy and his family relocated to Roanoke, where Wayne began to learn how to play piano and guitar. The Newton family then moved to Ohio, where he found his first taste of performing on stage with his brother Jerry under the name “the Rascals in Rhythm”. They would perform at local clubs, theaters and fairs singing the songs they grew up with. The Newton found themselves moving again in 1952 to Phoenix.

Around this time, the Rascals in Rhythm got their chance to perform on TV. The brothers appeared on the Grand Ole Opry roadshows and on ABC’s Ozark Jubilee. They were even lucky enough to perform in front of then-president Dwight D. Eisenhower!

In 1958, around the time Newton was a junior in high school, a booking agent from LAs vegas happened to see Newton on TV and booked the two brothers for an audition. This would eventually land them a deal to perform for the next five years, doing six shows a day! After going on The Jackie Gleason Show first in 1962, Wayne would appear on the show 12 times over the next 2 years, without his brother. He also landed a small singing role as “Andy” the baby-faced Ponderosa ranch hand on the classic western, Bonanza. And in 1963, Newton was signed to Capitol Records to start his singing career in the big league, and he would go on to record his big hit, “Danke Schoen” the same year. The song landed at number 13 on the Hot 100.

From the early 60’s to 70’s, Newton received support from multiple entertainment icons such as Lucille Ball, Bobby Darin, George Burns, and Jack Benny, who hired Newton to open for his show. After his stint with Benny was over, Newton boldly asked for his own headline act at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas, and he got it!

In 1972, Newton recorded “Daddy Don’t You Walk So Fast”

That song would blow his other hit out of the water, selling over one million copies and earning Newton a Gold Disk from the Recording Industry Association of America.

Gaining fame from the 70’s to the 80’s, Newton became a regular live performer in Las Vegas and around the country. On July 4th 1983, Newton began playing at the National Mall in DC for the Independence Day concerts, replacing acts such as The Beach Boys and The Grass Roots. Newton was an avid supporter of the Regan administration and would perform at various republican party campaigns as well as many events for Veterans. In 2001, Newton succeeded Bob Hope as chairman of the USO Celebrity Circle.

The 2000’s saw Newton appear as a guest star on many television shows and talk shows as many other early stars do. Some of these included The Entertainer, the 2007 NBA All-Star Weekend, Dancing with the Stars, and became the first celebrity guest on The Price is Right. He was a guest on Larry King Live and Late Night with Conan O’Brien. And even as recent as June 2020, Newton was featured in commercials promoting the reopening of Caesars Entertainment resorts in Las Vegas, where Newton got his start in showbiz.

Wayne Newton has had a long life doing what he loves most, performing songs all over the country for his beloved fans. From a lucky kid on the Las Vegas Strip to a worldwide entertainer, philanthropist, and charitable spokesman for causes spanning from veterans services to diabetes research.

Newton still plans to continue singing and playing just as he did back in 1962 with his brother.

This is Connor Clougherty, The Kid with an old soul on the Bob Katzen Baby Boomer and Gen X Show. Join us next weekend to hear about what has happened to another star from the past and find out, Where Are They Now.

Fun Facts

FF #1: He is of Irish, German, and Native American ancestry (his mother is half Cherokee).

FF #2: In 1994, Newton performed his 25,000th solo show in Las Vegas.

FF #3: Newton claims his two loves of his life are music and…horse breeding. He has been breeding Arabian Horses since 1969 and is the owner of a ranch that has produced six generations of horses, with 96 champions as of 2014. Newton received the Arabian Horse Breeders’ Association Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007.

FF #4: His hit song “Daddy don’t you walk so fast” became such a hit because Influential music director Rosalie Trombley of Canadian station CKLW “The Big 8” radio decided to add the record to her radio station to embarrass her ex-husband, who wasn’t faithful about seeing his children.

FF #5: In December of 1992, he released his Elvis inspired song “The Letter”, which would reach #1 on the Chashbox Pop and Country charts. This would be the first and only time in history that a record hit #1 on the Cashbox Top 100 chart, yet failed to chart on Billboard’s Hot 100.

Jay North (November 8, 2020; 4th segment appearance)

This week we will be looking at a child actor whose life puts a spotlight on the unseen side child actor’s life after early stardom. I am talking about Mr. Jay North, but you may know him better as your favorite neighborhood rapscallion, Dennis the Menace.

North’s early career was surprisingly busy for a child actor. It started in the late 1950’s when he starred in 8 television shows, 2 variety shows as well as 3 films. Some of these included the game shows The George Gobel Show, The Eddie Fisher Show and Queen For a Day (purposely not italicized to see if “Italics Dougherty” can handle an unitalicized TV show).

At age 7, he starred in this most notable role when he played Dennis Mitchell on the CBS comedy Dennis the Menace, which ran from 1959-1963.

The show was based on the comic strip of the same name created by Hank Ketcham. It followed the lives of the Mitchell family – Henry, Alice, and their only child, Dennis, an energetic, mischievous, but well-meaning boy, who often tangles with his peace-and-quiet-loving neighbor, George Wilson, a retired salesman. The NBC executives were impressed with North’s second audition and he was given the role over hundreds of boys that tried out for the part.
During filming for Dennis the Menace, North made small appearances on other shows such as 77 Sunset Strip, Rescue 8, Colt .45, and Sugarfoot. He would travel across the country with his aunt and uncle on the weekends to promote the show, as well as star in commercials for products like Kellog’s cereal, Skippy Peanut butter, and Bosco chocolate milk.

At only 8 years old, North began to feel the pressure of such a busy schedule that comes with being a child star.


By the summer of 1960, North had become sort of a cultural icon with the show really taking off in its second season. However, with the success of the series, North’s guardians had become strict and stern disciplinarians. He was not allowed to socialize with other cast members on the set and missed being around children his own age. His only opportunity to relax was the occasional “free day” when he could play baseball with other children or when his uncle would take him to see horror films.

Things just kept going downhill for North and the rest of the cast when they lost fellow cast member Joseph Kearns who played George Wilson. North stated that “Between the pressures of the business and Joe’s dying, I became very serious, very morbid, and very withdrawn from the world. I was the antithesis of the little kid that I played on the television show”. Ratings kept going down and by the spring of 63’ Dennis the Menace was cancelled.

North found trouble auditioning after his stint as Dennis due to how he was typecast into the role of the little trouble maker and how casting directors only saw him as his previous role. North took roles in a couple of movies from 1965 to 69’. He played the lead role in the MGM films Zebra in the Kitchen and Maya, where North got to film on location in India. The latter of the films was turned into a TV show and made North into a bit of a teen idol of sorts, appearing in teen magazines and gaining some fame with the teenage audiences.

Norths career would take an interesting turn when he would be cast as the narrator in the surf film, The Fantastic Plastic Machine, in 1969. This opened the door for a career as a voice actor and saw North go on to lend his voice to Prince Turhan in the Arabian Knights segment of The Banana Splits Adventure Hour, Terry Dexter in Here Comes the Grump, and a teenaged Bamm-Bamm Rubble on The Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm Show.

In 1974, North would star in his last big role in the coming-of-age suspense thriller The Teacher, opposite Angel Tompkins. The film surrounded a teacher-student romance, and some viewers thought the content was too vulgar for North which they still thought of as the young child actor, even 10 years later. The ghost of Dennis the Menace would follow North throughout his life even into his time in the US Navy in 1977.

He received harsh treatment from his crewmates for being a former actor and wanted out immediately. In 1979 he left on honorable discharge and headed back to LA.

In the following years, North would attempt to act again and land a few more small roles, eventually retreating from the public eye and trying his luck in screenwriting. In 1990, after hearing about the suicide of a fellow former child actor, North was hit with a reality check that he would end up down a similar path. He then worked with ex-teenage idol Paul Petersen who played Jeff on the “Donna Reed Show” and who also had a hit song.

Jay joined Paul’s organization, named “A Minor Consideration,” and Jay used his experiences to counsel child stars dealing with the same pressures and difficulties he had faced growing up. As of 2011, North now works in the Florida juvenile justice system as a correctional officer helping troubled youth stay out of a life of crime.

Jay North is a prime example of the unknown side of being a child actor and the life long stress and issues that follow them. It is great to see him using his troubling past in a positive way to help kids in similar situations.

FUN FACTS

FF #1: North’s mother worked for the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and used her connections to arrange for him to appear on his favorite television program, local LA children’s show Cartoon Express.

FF #2: While playing Dennis the Menace, North was paid $500 per episode, his strawberry red hair was bleached platinum blonde for the role, and the 8-year-old was instructed to “shave” a year off his age when speaking with the press.

FF #3: In October 1988, he acted out his frustrations towards Hollywood in a comedy sketch on an episode of HBO’s Not Necessarily the News, spoofing his role as Dennis the Menace. Dressed in the trademark overalls, striped t-shirt and cowlick, 37-year-old North portrayed an angry adult Dennis, taking revenge on “Hollywood pigs” with a telescopic rifle.

FF #4: The young lad dipped his toe into the music business by recording “The Misadventures of Dennis the Menace” soundtrack stories, as well as an LP album of songs titled Jay North – look who’s singing!

Butch Patrick (November 1, 2020; 3rd segment appearance)

The 1950s and 60s were not strangers to TV shows and movies surrounding goblins, ghouls, zombies, ghosts, and other creatures of the night. Just look at shows such as The Addams Family, The Twilight Zone, Bewitched, if you count teenage witches. Following in the theme of all things spooky and scary, this week we look at a show that featured quite the cast of ghoulish characters, a whole family of them actually; The Munsters! We will be checking up on our favorite little wolverine, Eddie Munster, played by Mr. Butch Patrick.

Just as many other child stars, Patrick got his start at the early age of 7! He got his feet wet doing television commercials and in 1961 got his debut in movies by starring in Warner Brothers’ The Two Little Bears. Over the next two years, Patrick went on to appear in guest-starring roles on numerous television series, including Bonanza, My Favorite Martian, Mister Ed, and Rawhide and recurring roles on The Real McCoys and General Hospital.

His most notable role came in 1964, when he was cast as little Eddie Munster.

He was chosen out of hundreds of boys who auditioned and Patrick states that he thinks it was because of bad dental hygiene. He says “…it was because my fangs were my own teeth. My teeth were so bad, that even when I closed my mouth they stuck out.” His stint in The Munsters lasted the show’s two season run from 64 to 66 appearing in 70 episodes.

Patrick continued to appear in guest-starring roles on various popular television series of the 1960s, including I Dream of Jeannie, Death Valley Days, Gunsmoke, The Monkees, and Daniel Boone, as well as a recurring role as Gordon Dearing on the CBS family comedy series My Three Sons. During this time, Patrick also appeared in several Walt Disney films, as well as portraying the role of Milo in the 1970 MGM film The Phantom Tollbooth.

Patrick got his second big break when he landed a role as the lead in the Saturday morning children’s program Lidsville, broadcast on ABC.

Lidsville was a psychedelic fantasy series in which Patrick portrayed Mark, a boy lost in a strange land of walking, talking, singing hats which ran from 1971 to 73. I tip my hat to whoever got that show approved for air time, no pun intended.
When he decided to take a break from acting, Patrick learned how to play bass guitar and in 1983, recorded the song “What Happened to Eddie” under the group name Eddie and the Monsters.

Set to the tune of the Munsters theme, the song details his life as a Munster, with such lyrics as “I spend my night just howling at the moon, or hanging out at a creepy black lagoon.” Sounds like an average tuesday night for me. Patrick also recorded the song “It’s Only Halloween” in 2007, but unfortunately, his music career never got legs. I guess you can’t get very famous in the music business off of Halloween themed music these days.

Like many other child stars, Butch Patrick will continue to make cameo appearances referencing back to his days as a kid werewolf on The Munsters, but who knows maybe one Halloween he will surprise us all with another hit single from Eddie and the Monsters.

Fun Facts

FF #1: Patrick credits his lucky break into the acting biz to his sister who he says always wanted to be an actor and dropped Patrick’s name during a casting call which got his career off and running.

FF #2: His real name is Patrick Lilley, however his manager and mother came up with Butch Patrick as a stage name. He still uses it as his name to this day.

FF #3: His video for “What Happened to Eddie” premiered on MTV “On The Air” in 1983, making Eddie and the Monsters the first unsigned act ever to be seen on the show. This led to the creation of the show “The Basement Tapes” that discovered many new unsigned bands with videos.

FF #4: Patrick is a cancer survivor and works with people with addiction issues. He had his own issues with his life and, after 40 years of alcohol and drug abuse, he’s been clean and sober nearly 4 years. So congrats to him!

Susan Cowsill (October 25, 2020; 2nd segment appearance)

As you may have noticed, family bands were a popular theme throughout the 1960s and 70s, most who found their fame as adults or after they split ways to pursue solo careers. But if you want a band who made their hits before most of the members hit puberty, look no further than The Cowsills. Coming out of Rhode Island, the Cowsills had a short lived but successful career and showcased how talented kids could be if you gave them a guitar, keyboard, drum set, and a mic. Today we focus on the youngest of the Cowsill children, Susan Cowsill.

Susan Cowsill’s music career started at the young age of only 7 years old when she joined her brothers Bill, Bob, Barry, Paul, and John along with her mother Barbara in the family music group the Cowsills in 1966. The family band really only lasted about 5 years, but they were able to pump out some hits along the way including “Indian Lake”, “The Rain, the Park and Other Things”, and the hit that became their most popular, “Hair.”

Little Susan was relegated to playing tambourine for most of the albums and would help with background harmonies as she grew up. Her first solo vocal was a song called Ask the Children, featured in the Cowsills’ third album, Captain Sad And His Ship Of Fools. By the time she left the band in 71’ Susan had learned to play other instruments, such as the bass, which would help her later in her solo career.

During the 1970’s she took a break from the music business until the early 80’s where she sprung back onto the scene as a backing vocalist for Dwight Twilley’s band, where she sang on multiple albums including 1984’s Jungle. Her backing vocal talent was in high demand in the 1990’s and she was recruited to work with the likes of Hootie & the Blowfish, Giant Sand, the Smithereens, and Carlene Carter. Her move back into the spotlight came when she helped form the alt-country supergroup The Continental Drifters, alongside former Bangles guitarist Vicki Peterson and Peter Holsapple of the dB’s. In 1992, Susan and Peter got married and eventually had a daughter together. However, their marriage would only last until 2001 when they would get a divorce.

Susan’s love for music would see her form a couple of side projects as the years went by including The Psycho Sisters with fellow Continental Drifter Viki Peterson, who even though playing together for more than 20 years only released their first official album in 2014, as well as The Bonoffs which never saw much light and played little gigs around New Orleans. Susan finally launched her own solo band in 2005, aptly named The Susan Cowsill Band, and has recorded two albums of her own; Just Believe it in 2005 and Lighthouse in 2010. Susan married the band’s drummer, Russ Broussard, in 2003 and they are still together to this day.

Susan and the remaining members of the Cowsill’s still perform together every now and then, but nothing will beat her and her brothers dancing and singing along on the Dean Martin show back in the 60’s. This is Connor Clougherty, The Kid with an old soul on the Bob Katzen Show. Join us next weekend to hear about what has happened to another star from the past and find out, Where Are They Now.

Fun Facts

FF #1: Susan’s contribution to the Cowsills’ backing vocals made her the youngest person to be directly involved in a top ten hit record when “Indian Lake” made the Top 10 in the early summer of 1968. This achievement came upon her ninth birthday.

FF #2: Her second album Lighthouse, is a concept album in which she reflects on her losses, mainly through Hurricane Katrina and the deaths of brothers Barry and Bill. The album features harmonies from her surviving brothers (Bob, Paul and John) as well as appearances by Jackson Browne and Vicki Peterson.

FF #3: Over the past few years, Susan and her brothers Bob and Paul reunited and have appeared many times as the Cowsills as part of the 2016 Happy Together tour which has included The Turtles, Check Negronof Three Dog Nite, The Association, Mark Lindsay of Paul Revere and the Raiders and the Vogues. In fact, they will all be appearing at the Lynn Auditorium in Lynn, Massachusetts on Sunday, June 21, 2021 at 7:30 p.m.

FF #4: The Cowsills were the inspiration for 1970s television show The Partridge Family, and the Cowsill kids were even considered to star as the leading kids, however they were too old at the time.

Mike Lookinland (October 4, 2020; debut / 1st segment appearance)

Have you ever been sitting at home watching some reruns of your favorite shows and you say “oh man I loved this character. I wonder where they are now…”. So have I! Today we will be looking at what happened to the youngest Brady brother, played by Mr. Mike Lookinland.

The Brady Bunch was a show beloved by millions that ran from 1969 to 1974. As you know the show followed a large blended family of six kids, three girls and three boys, and the hyginx and family drama that ensued in their day to day lives. Topics of young to teenage life mixed with the awkward scenarios of living in a new blended family. The Brady kids were all fun characters, but today we are focusing on the youngest boy Bobby Brady and what happened to his career after the show.

Mike Lookinland started his acting career at age 7, and by age 9 had been seen in numerous commercials for Band Aids, Cheerios, and some toy brands. While filming the Brady Bunch, Lookinland lent his voice to play Oblio (Oh-B-Low) in the 1971 animated film The Point! In 1974, after the Brady Bunch had wrapped its filming, he starred in the blockbuster film The Towering Inferno, alongside Paul Newman and Jennifer Jones. He was also involved in the 1970’s show The Secret of Isis about a “seemingly normal school teacher, who transforms into the Egyptian goddess when presented with crises a mere mortal cannot resolve”. The 1970s were a busy time for Lookinland, but his acting credits never surpassed that of little Bobby Brady.

Lookinland reprised his role in the 1988 Christmas special A Very Brady Christmas and again in the 1990’s series The Bradys, which focused on the Brady kids all grown up as adults, who saw that coming. In the show, Bobby Brady was involved in a car accident which resulted in Lookinland acting from a wheelchair for most of the series. In 2019, he joined the rest of the Brady kids in the series A Very Brady Renovation which showcased the house used in the original Brady Bunch show being renovated with guest appearances by the kids who would help renovate their respective rooms while reminiscing about the show. A real treat for die hard Brady fans.

In his personal life, Mike Lookinland took up a passion behind the scenes of television. He dropped out of the University of Utah to pursue a career as a production assistant and camera operator. He has worked on the Halloween franchise of horror movies in the 80’s as well as appearing as a camera op in the background of the 2000’s film Growing Up Brady, which starred Mike’s own son playing Bobby Brady. Like father, like son as they say.

In 1987, Mike married Kelly Wermuth whom he met while working on Halloween 4. They have two kids, Scott and Joe. The Lookinlands are currently living life in Mike’s home state of Utah, where Mike runs a business that makes decorative concrete in Salt Lake City.

From child commercial star to artistic concrete architect, Mike Lookinland has had quite the life, but to us he will always be known and loved as little Bobby Brady.

Fun Facts

FF #1 – Mike was almost not Bobby Brady. Mike’s family decided Mike should take the role as Bobby Brady over a role he was offered as the son Eddie Corbett in “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father” – a role that eventually went to Brandon Cruz. Mike’s family thought that it would be healthier for him to be around other kids, rather than being the only child amongst an all-adult cast which was the case on “The Courtship of Eddie’s father.” Had the decision gone the other way, Mike wouldn’t be Bobby Brady and I probably wouldn’t be telling you where he is now.

FF #2 – Robert Reed, who played the father Mike Brady, was responsible for Mike’s interest in cameras and eventually to his job as a cameraman. Robert Reed gave Super 8 movie cameras to all the kids for gifts and Mike became fascinated with cameras. He used to sit next to the camera men on the set and ask tons of questions, learning all he could.

FF #3 – Mike’s natural hair color was strawberry blonde and it was very wavey. But the producers dyed his hair black with Clairol Hair Color #43 and straightened it for the show in order to match the hair color of Peter and Greg and his dad Mike Brady. The lights on set though were so hot that his dye job would sometimes run down his face. During the last two seasons, his natural hair color was finally allowed to show.

FF #4 – Outside of TV Land, Lookinland has described himself as a major Deadhead, having been to over 100 Grateful Dead shows across the country.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •